CVMA® National and Texas State History

History of CVMA

History of CVMA

History of CVMA®

In 1999, the Combat Vets Motorcycle Club was introduced to the internet.  Initially it was believed that the CVMC was an actual established motorcycle organization but, in early 2001, it was discovered that CVMC was simply an internet scam designed to milk money from combat veterans.

 

Still wanting to remain organized for the purpose of supporting veterans issues,

forty-five members decided to form a Combat Veterans Association.  In May of 2001 the Combat Veterans Motorcycle Association® was started as a non-profit organization, allowing its members to continue working toward their main objective of helping  veterans.

 

The original 45 members have adopted a patch to wear indicating that they are the original founding members of CVMA®.

 

In May of 2001, the CVMA® adopted the CVMA® / VFW patch.  This was done with the VFW's  permission as all CVMA® members were or became VFW members, entitling them to wear the VFW  patch.  Over the next year and a half the CVMA® was well accepted at Post and  Division levels within the VFW, but repeated meetings, letters, and conversations with the VFW National failed to define an officially recognized relationship between CVMA® and VFW.

 

In December of 2002, the CVMA® membership voted to begin moving towards officially establishing the type of association its members wanted to be, independent of the VFW or any other organization.  As part of this decision, VFW membership was no longer required, opening the CVMA® up to all Combat Veterans who ride a motorcycle.

 

On December 15, 2002, it was voted that the CVMA® would wear a combination of the CVMA® / VFW  background and the old CVMC skull logo as a one piece patch. Membership requirements being that a new member had to be a combat veteran and had to ride a motorcycle as a hobby.  This patch is worn by Full Combat  Members only.

History of Texas CVMA

On April 29, 2007, there were 22 current CVMA® members within the State of Texas , which was enough to start a chapter. The membership was spread across Texas. Since a meeting needed to take place, the central area that was decided on to have a “meet and greet” was the small town of McGregor, Texas. Scotty says that he had rode through the town before and that he remembered a nice restaurant. Through email, all members were invited to the Coffee Shop in McGregor.

Those members present were: left to right; Preacher, Scooter, Cole, Mustang, Whiskey Joe, Poncho, Swamprat, Scotty, Steve Anderson (Scotty's Friend) and Vagabond. On a side note, Scooter, a Desert Storm Vet was the newest member who had joined the chapter just two days prior. The only Auxiliary member at that time in Texas was Sunshine who was present and took this photo at that initial meeting.

Formed as the 23rd State Chapter, the new unit was designated as Chapter 23 and its’ designated location was Dallas, as most of the officers were from the Dallas/Ft Worth area. Scotty accepted and was elected as the Commander, Preacher was the Executive Officer (XO), and Cole was Sergeant At Arms. The Commander appointed Scooter as the Secretary and Whiskey Joe as the Treasurer. Poncho soon assumed those Treasurer duties and Whiskey Joe was eventually made the State Rep. The membership was dispersed throughout Texas and the new members looked forward to meeting all members in other areas and expanding. It was not too long before the membership grew sufficiently to form detachments.

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